The abolition of slavery and the aftermath of emancipation in Brazil [electronic resource] / Rebecca J. Scott, Seymour Drescher, Hebe Maria Mattos de Castro, George Reid Andrews, Robert M. Levine.

In May 1888 the Brazilian parliament passed, and Princess Isabel (acting for her father, Emperor Pedro II) signed, the lei aurea, or Golden Law, providing for the total abolition of slavery. Brazil thereby became the last "civilized nation" to part with slavery as a legal institution. The...

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Online Access: Full Text (via Duke)
Main Authors: Scott, Rebecca J. (Rebecca Jarvis), 1950- (Author), Drescher, Seymour (Author), Castro, Hebe Maria Mattos de (Author), Andrews, George Reid (Author), Levine, Robert M. (Author)
Format: Electronic eBook
Language:English
Published: Durham : Duke University Press, 1988.
Series:e-Duke books scholarly collection.
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Summary:In May 1888 the Brazilian parliament passed, and Princess Isabel (acting for her father, Emperor Pedro II) signed, the lei aurea, or Golden Law, providing for the total abolition of slavery. Brazil thereby became the last "civilized nation" to part with slavery as a legal institution. The freeing of slaves in Brazil, as in other countries, may not have fulfilled all the hopes for improvement it engendered, but the final act of abolition is certainly one of the defining landmarks of Brazilian history. The articles presented here represent a broad scope of scholarly inquiry that covers developmen.
Item Description:"The text of this book was originally published without the present introduction or the index as volume 68, number 3 (August 1988) of the Hispanic American historical review"--Title page verso.
Physical Description:1 online resource (vi, 173 pages)
Bibliography:Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN:9780822381549
0822381540
DOI:10.1215/9780822381549