Japanese-American relocation in World War II : a reconsideration / Roger W. Lotchin, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

In this revisionist history of the United States government relocation of Japanese-American citizens during World War II, Roger W. Lotchin challenges the prevailing notion that racism was the cause of the creation of these centers. After unpacking the origins and meanings of American attitudes towar...

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Bibliographic Details
Online Access: Full Text (via Internet Archive)
Main Author: Lotchin, Roger W. (Author)
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Cambridge, United Kingdom ; New York, NY, USA : Cambridge University Press, 2018.
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Summary:In this revisionist history of the United States government relocation of Japanese-American citizens during World War II, Roger W. Lotchin challenges the prevailing notion that racism was the cause of the creation of these centers. After unpacking the origins and meanings of American attitudes toward the Japanese-Americans, Lotchin then shows that Japanese relocation was a consequence of nationalism rather than racism. Lotchin also explores the conditions in the relocation centers and the experiences of those who lived there, with discussions on health, religion, recreation, economics, consumerism, and theater. He honors those affected by uncovering the complexity of how and why their relocation happened, and makes it clear that most Japanese-Americans never went to a relocation center.
Physical Description:1 online resource (xvi, 347 pages)
Bibliography:Includes bibliographical references and index.